doublecreampinchofshutter said: Hey Adriano: was wondering what is the function of having utilising the manica spostata method of stitching the armscye in a dress shirt. (aka, armscye seam offset). Is it for range of movement? Thanks

I don’t really know. A case could probably be made for greater resistance to tearing rather than extra mobility.

Like with so many other tailoring details, we struggle to figure out their hidden meaning — only to find out years later that there was none, it was only just a style choice all along. I suspect that it’s also the case with this shirtmaking detail.

To distinguish themselves, tailors like to show off their supposed skill by adding extra steps that are outwardly visible, but whose functional utility is actually questionable, when you dig deeper.

Sometimes a style catches on, transforming itself over time into a fallacious indicator of ‘quality’, and clients then begin to presume their was initially some tailoring justification for the extra manufacturing step.

The more time goes by, the more I just care about fabrics and styles, everything else appears to be marketing fluff — even some hardworking artisans fall prey to this internet-legend-building, sorry guys.

At the end of the day, if it looks good, who cares how it was made.

Anonymous said: Bonjour, est-ce qu il y a une marque particulière que vous pouvez acheter en sachant que tout marchera nickel sans retouches?

Oui, beaucoup de marques PAP fonctionnent sans retouches pour moi (hormis la longueur pantalon qui reste toujours a faire bien entendu, chez toutes les marques.)

Dernièrement le 52R de Formosa n’a requis aucune retouche pour moi.

Canali
Noname
Noname
Lobb

Tags: canali

Canali
NK Fashion
Sozzi
Finsbury

Tags: canali

My interview in a leading #menswear blog.

Boggi
Arthur & Fox
Boggi

Boggi
Arthur & Fox
Boggi

wellwornwornwell:

I often come back to the cliché of “buy less, buy better.” To analyze the maxim is to take a fascinating look into the psyche of those most interested in men’s clothing. While it is undoubtedly the campaign slogan of the iGent movement, people don’t seem to really understand it. Instead they use…

This post sums it up quite well.

Makes me think of the Oscar Wilde quote: “I have the simplest tastes. I am always satisfied with the best.”

I know guys who live by this maxim, having very few items in their wardrobe, almost all bespoke. I must admit that I admire their restraint and their sense of curation. They probably enjoy each item alot more than somebody (like me?) who owns a ton of stuff.

After having gone to an extreme in the accumulation phase — as followers of this blog well know — I’m now coming back full circle, trying to own less, and only acquiring an additional item if it’s really worth it.

My belief is that how expensive an item is, or how well-made, is less important than how well-tailored to your silhouette it is. Whether you own expensive or inexpensive clothes, the precision of the alterations is ultimately what’s going to make all the difference when it comes to grabbing people’s attention.

Lastly, here’s an argument that perhaps doesn’t get mentioned enough in defence of clothes horses like ourselves: VARIETY.

Sure, it’s great to own just one perfect bespoke navy blazer. But once you’ve worn it God knows how many times, it starts to get old for your entourage, and even for yourself.

Owning a number of items in a larger wardrobe allows you to mix-and-match, always creating new looks, keeping the game fresh, staying on your toes by pushing new limits.

It’s the one thing I don’t regret about my choice to own a huge wardrobe: it has allowed me to keep evolving and refining my tastes each and everyday.

The purpose of this blog, since it was launched in April 2012, is to make sure that no two daily outfits are exactly the same. I do hope I’ve succeeded.

Tags: review

Cifonelli
Cifonelli
Charvet
Altan

Tags: cifonelli

Anonymous said: Dear Adriano, would you mind recommending a couple of magazines or books about the etiquette or men's clothing? I read a lot on the internet but I was wondering if some kind of "Bible" or anything interesting about the different codes exist. In French or English, I don't mind.

Dressing the Man - A. Flusser
Gentleman - B. Roetzel
The Suit - N. Antongiavanni

Anonymous said: Bonjour! Il semble que le seul motif que vous portez est POW (?). Que pensez vous des autres, genre rayures, carreaux, birdseye, pied de poule..., sont ils admissibles pour le monde des affaires? En général, à votre avis, quels motifs sont pour quelles occasions? Sont les uns plus casuals que les autres? Merci!

J’aime tous ces motifs, et je les porte régulièrement, vous le constaterez en parcourant les archives de ce blog.

Pour moi, ils sont tous totalement adapté aux costumes pour le business, à l’exception du pied de poule qui doit être très petit pour que ça passe.

La règle historique c’est que plus le motif est voyant ou large, plus la tenue est perçue comme sport.

Cette règle disparait progressivement, au fur et a mesure que les distinctions ville/sport s’estompent dans le vestiaire masculin.

Another brown (neapolitan) summer suit:

Pagliara 1848
Café Cotton
Handson
Jean-Manuel Moreau
Finsbury

If any followers know anything about Pagliara, please fill me in — I need to find out where to buy more suits from them, great value.

Tags: pagliara

Anonymous said: "3 pattern challenge another example when no ps" This does NOT work. You have not met the challenge. The scale of the stripe in the tie is TOO similar to the scale of the check in the jacket. And the introduction of the bold red does not compliment the rest of the ensemble in any way. All of the other separates work well together, the tie should have been a navy with a small scale pattern OR possibly a Cape Blue with a narrow spaced red stripe or a red pattern. Challenge FAIL.

The motto of PG is ‘First know the rules, then break them.’ Words to live by.

I’m well aware of the ‘rules’. The point of this blog is to test some of them every now and then.

This fit breaks 3 or 4 rules at once. But maybe not the ones you think. Different pattern/similar scale is a well known rule, not broken here.

The red tie is debatable, granted. I consciously went against navy which was the way too obvious choice.

And I live by another rule: if it pleases me, who cares what the rules say.

Here’s an unexpected yet welcome follower notice that just hit my inbox:

In France, this man is like the CEO for all CEOs. Pierre Gattaz is the head of the powerful lobby that pressures the government in favour of France’s largest corporations.

I’ve never seen him as a sharp dresser, so I’m assuming his community manager must be…

Whatever the case, it is always good news for #menswear if more CEOs pay closer attention to elegant business attire and bespoke suits.

Followers of this blog know that we militantly oppose the ever-growing business casual trend, and that we strongly favor a massive return to tie-wearing in all aspects of business life.

Here’s an unexpected yet welcome follower notice that just hit my inbox:

In France, this man is like the CEO for all CEOs. Pierre Gattaz is the head of the powerful lobby that pressures the government in favour of France’s largest corporations.

I’ve never seen him as a sharp dresser, so I’m assuming his community manager must be…

Whatever the case, it is always good news for #menswear if more CEOs pay closer attention to elegant business attire and bespoke suits.

Followers of this blog know that we militantly oppose the ever-growing business casual trend, and that we strongly favor a massive return to tie-wearing in all aspects of business life.

3 pattern challenge.

Another example when no ps is the right ps.

Also an illustration of the versatility of the tan chino — allowing you to even forego the thumbrule of contrast between odd jacket and trou.

Canali
Noname shirt
Stradel’s
Zara (beleive it or not)
Lobb

Tags: canali

preppylumberjack said: Merci, Adriano! I'm 20 and really admire your style. When in your life did you start to dress the way you do now?

As soon as I entered the professional world, some 20 years ago, I started to wear suits. Since then, improving my style has been a long & continuous journey. Blogging about style has been the latest step along the way, as it forces me to keep my game up for my daily selfies. Lots of fun really.